Report 1:

Gender Equality and Transformation in JSE-Listed Companies – March 2021

Prepared By: Tiekie Barnard, CEO & Founder, Shared Value Africa Initiative and Shift Impact Africa

REPORT EXTRACT

It is generally known that women are underrepresented in executive and board membership roles in private sector organisations. While the work done by organisations such as the 30% Club is commendable, the aspiration of 25% to 30% representation for women as a regulatory requirement can no longer be deemed sufficient for business change and growth, as shown in the McKinsey Global Institute Report (2015) and the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report (2020). It has to be the foremost imperative for every business to ensure women’s positions in power in boardrooms and at executive management level.

During his Women’s Day address on 9 August 2020 President Ramaphosa said: “The emancipation of women is only words on paper unless it is matched by the commitment from all sectors of society”. This statement follows the formation of the Global Leaders of the Generation Equality Actions Coalitions on 1 July 2020 by UN Women that aims “to accelerate gender equality. Leaders from Member States, civil society, women’s rights organizations, international organizations, UN agencies, philanthropic entities, youth-led organizations, and the private sector come together to make a commitment to deliver game-changing results for women and girls”.

This report aims to provide an insight into women’s representation at an executive leadership level among a pilot study of 14 Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) listed companies. It also seeks to encourage the business community to accelerate the process of achieving gender parity to facilitate much-needed economic growth and societal cohesion.

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Report 2:
How the Private Sector Can Address the Issue of GBV

By Dr Corne Davis, Department of Strategic Communication, University of Johannesburg

There have been increasing calls to all sectors to intervene in addressing GBV, its economic cost to the global economy was estimated at $1.5 trillion (UN Women, 2016). The economic cost of GBV to South Africa has been estimated at between R28.4 and R42.4 billion (KPMG, 2014). Still, there has been little evidence of widespread successful GBV interventions (Abrahams, Mathews, Martin Lombard & Jewkes, 2013). It has also become clear, as Morrison and Orlando (2005) argue, that accounting-based measures of GBV were insufficient, suggesting that different perspectives are needed. While many private sector organisations have GBV interventions through corporate philanthropy, they have not taken action to address the issue head on.

The purpose of this commentary is to show that just funding non-government organisations dealing with GBV issues is no longer sufficient. GBV is the responsibility of stakeholders across all sectors and the criticality of the private sector’s participation and intervention, in particular, has to be clearly articulated.

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How the Private Sector Can Address the Issue of GBV has been published by African Safety Promotion Journal. It is accessible on the African Journals Online (https://journals.co.za/content/journal/safety) and South African Medical Research Council (https://www.samrc.ac.za/content/social-and-health-sciences-journal) websites.

Report 3
Joint GBVF Dialogue Report – NBI & SVAI

Gender-based violence and the private Sector

Jointly prepared by the National Business Initiative (NBI) and the Shared Value Africa Initiative (SVAI)

MAY 2020 | Gender Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) has been an important issue in our society for years, and this year, the COVID-19 pandemic created even more focus on this key issue – rendering it “the second pandemic”. Across the world, communities were place under various levels of lockdown and restriction, creating even more isolation for victims of GBVF.

In a time where business is challenged to look beyond profit to how it can support broader society through COVID-19 and beyond, it became important to look at what business is doing with regards to GBVF; particularly when it relates to their work force that was mostly home-based.

From 26 to 29 May 2020, the Shared Value Africa Initiative collaborated with the National Business Initiative on a set of webinar discussions with the private sector, to discuss what is currently being done to support employees – and what more could be done. These virtual roundtable discussions also focused on how business society can collaborate to tackle GBVF.

Gender based violence

This along with an online survey the in-depths discussions are covered in this report, which provides key points of the discussions, as well as recommendations from the panel.

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